Go team!! Why do we love rooting for the home team and being fans so much? It’s part of our identities. We attach so much importance to team allegiances. We get emotional, we get excited, we keep track of statistics and players and wins/losses. Maybe “we” is too much of a generalization, but I feel like here in America especially, everyone has a favorite team of some sort.

The Cleveland Indians’ 2017 season recently came to an abrupt end, the team coasting through the final month of the regular season with a record-setting 22-game win streak but ultimately losing the American League Division Series to the Yankees after 5 games. It was disappointing for sure, but as a lifelong Cleveland fan, I’m pretty used to experiencing loss. The Cavs brought a championship to Cleveland last year for the first time in my lifetime, but since baseball is my one true love as far as sports go, I’m still holding out for a World Series win by the Indians (their last one was in 1948). Last year, they came about as close as you can get, losing to the Cubs in game 7 in extra innings.

There’s something really special about maintaining a loyalty to a certain team. In my communications theory class, we discussed how proximity and shared interests draw us to other people. When you find out you are from a common hometown or area, or you are fans of the same team, it makes for an instant connection. These are your people. It’s fitting that the nickname for the Indians team is the Tribe. It really is our tribe.

I attended my first ever postseason baseball game on Oct. 5th in Cleveland. It was the first game of the ALDS; people were excited, hopeful. The stadium was packed full, loud, electrifying. The Indians were looking good, it was an easy 4-0 win that night. It was natural to chat with and high-five the strangers around us. We were all there for a common purpose. We were rooting for the home team. The phrase “Rally Together” was emblazoned everywhere you looked. Everyone sang along to “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” with a smile during the 7th-inning stretch. There’s something about coming together for that major shared interest, coming together as fans.

The same applies for many things. Going to see a band in concert, keeping up with a favorite TV show or seeing the work of a favorite artist in a museum. There’s something about humanity that craves connection and familiarity. I love sharing excitement (and even disappointment) with thousands of strangers. I love things that can bring us closer, even if only for a moment.

What do you think? Has being a fan of something ever made you some fast friends? Isn’t there something special about having a home team? After all, there’s no place like home.

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