There’s so much going on in the world today. So much good, so much bad, so much exciting, and so much mundane.

In a way, social media has leveled the playing field. Major news headlines sit alongside headlines of lesser importance about celebrities or sports. People from anywhere in the world with WiFi access can have a discussion in the comments on a Facebook post. It seems like everything is accessible thanks to the internet and in turn, this makes everything harder to filter and process.

It’s so hard to focus in this world, but focus we must.

In recent years, it has become painfully evident to me how much I struggle to keep myself on task when I’m alone. I have gotten much better at cultivating focus out of necessity, but every so often I still have days when I just feel constantly restless, when it is just difficult to think. I tend to do best when I am in a semi-public place, like a coffee shop or library. My self-consciousness keeps me accountable to my work when there are other humans around me.

In addition to forcing yourself to focus in order to finish a certain task, it is also important to cultivate focus in your hobbies/activities and interests as well. This is perhaps where I struggle the most. I love doing anything remotely creative, so I often end up creating nothing because I can only think about the ten different things I want to try–weaving, sewing, painting, you name it–and end up indecisive and doing none of the above. Something that has really helped me lately is realizing that (God willing) I have time. I don’t need to learn and try everything I ever want to learn and try right now. I can focus on one thing at a time, and then move on to something else when I have sufficiently explored the topic. As much as I am always living either 10 years into my past or future in my head, I am very much here-and-now in reality: not a big planner, probably too emotionally-led, always wanting to do everything on my to-do list at once, and often a play-before-work kind of person.

I think about something my ballet/yoga teacher said to me when I once asked her about the potential challenges of teaching ballet in the 21st century. She said the challenge is that kids these days (or their parents) aren’t as willing to make the commitment. Ballet is one of those art forms that takes a solid 10 years minimum to really learn, to get the posture and muscle memory and all the nuances down. You can tell a trained dancer from a casual class-taker often just by the way they move their upper body, their port de bras; the minute hand, finger, and arm movements requiring years to develop into the strong but delicate proper expression.

I wondered the other day about how different I might look and move if I had grown up playing basketball or something instead of ballet. When you spend so much time on something, it truly shapes you. My feet instinctively feel the floor as I walk, my toes automatically point and reach for the steps as I descend stairs. When I look in the mirror and stand up straighter I can still see the ghost of my ballet posture, lean and long. It’s been years since I was consistently in class, but my body still remembers the movements that were drilled into my muscles by repetition during my developmental years. I didn’t do much besides ballet growing up; it was my primary, and sometimes only, extracurricular activity. I was in class 2-4 days a week from age 8 to age 18, with hours of rehearsal around performances up to 4 times a year. This is partly where I learned the importance of focus.

Now that I’m in full control of my life outside of school and spending hours in a ballet studio is no longer part of my routine, the art of focus is a constant pursuit more than ever. There’s just so much I want to do, but life is so short, and we must choose wisely. I didn’t really intend for this post to go so deep when I started writing it, but this topic has been on my heart for the last few years. Simplify, simplify. Focus. That’s the real key.

Where do you need to cultivate more focus in your life?

2 thoughts on “Focus

  1. Oh my, this is exactly how I’ve been feeling / my situation.
    I have so many dreams, so many things I wanna do, learn, try.. yeah, you name it.
    But I get lost in the “what now”? bc I wanna be wise, I wanna do it, but I don’t wanna waste my time.
    My head & my mind is sometimes killing me..
    I think this is an important topic (I wrote a little instagram caption on this, where you commented, that’s why I’m reading this & I’m relieved I’m not the only one).
    I think we live in a time, where we have so many opportunities & choices that it overwhelmes us.
    It’s probably a luxury from before, where we didn’t have so many choices to do what we wanted, but I think we’re often forgetting about the other end of this; – having too much to choose from –
    very interesting. I hope you’ll write more on this, I’d love for this conversation to keep going!

    so if you’d ever wanted to have interesting & thought-provoking + helping conversations like this, I’m always up to talk about and figure out things together.. Or maybe even collaborate on something together. in short; hit me up! 😉

    thanks for writing this! I feel a little less alone now. And more determined to clear my mind.
    as a matter of fact, i’m actually sitting in front of a big paper, where I’ll try and sort my future out in a 5-year-plan ish. not to follow religiously, but to have something to fall back on, when I feel lost. 🙂

    1. Yes, you’re totally right, so many choices are in a way a luxury, but it’s often too much and definitely makes everything much harder. And I love the 5-year plan idea, I wrote out a 3-month plan at the beginning of the summer and it really helped me focus my energy on the most important things, I really should sit down and think productively about the more long term!

      Thanks so much for taking the time to read and comment, I will be sure to reach out sometime, especially if I write more on this topic! 🙂

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *